Governor Quinn, Advocates Warn 65,000 Will Lose Illinois Substance Abuse Prevention, Treatment

(Springfield, IL) — The doomsday budget recently approved by the Illinois General Assembly cuts 50% from state human service programs, and Governor Pat Quinn‘s administration is warning substance abuse prevention and treatment services will witness the elimination of 65,000 people from care, according to Sara Moscato Howe, CEO of the Illinois Alcoholism and Drug Dependence Association.

Haymarket Executive Vice President and IADDA Board Chair, Anthony Cole, explains the impact of the Illinois doomsday budget on Haymarket clients receiving addiction healthcare services to WBBM/CBS-TV in Chicago:


News Video: Illinois Doomsday Budget Will Cause Crime to Spike, Jails to Fill, IADDA Warns Quinn, Madigan, Cross, Cullerton, and Radogno

(Springfield, IL) — In an interview with WICS/ABC-TV in Springfield, IADDA CEO Sara Moscato Howe warns Governor Pat Quinn, House Speaker Michael Madigan, House Minority Tom Cross, Senate President John Cullerton, and Senate Minority Leader Christine Radogno that crime will spike and local jail populations will explode under a doomsday budget that cuts 60% or more of substance abuse prevention and treatment services.

Ron Howell from Recovery Resources in Quincy explains the impact of such drastic cuts on drug treatment would have in Adams County during a WGEM-TV interview.

more about “News Video: IADDA Says Crime Will Spi…“, posted with vodpod

Illinois ‘Doomsday’ Budget Slashes Drug Treatment for 65,000 Residents; Madigan, Cullerton, Cross, Radogno, and Quinn Urged to “Get Back to Work”

(Springfield, IL) – Illinois’ addiction prevention and treatment advocates today denounced the ‘doomsday’ budget approved by the Illinois legislature on Sunday, saying it will slash drug treatment for more than 65,000 Illinois residents starting on July 1, 2009.

“This budget will destroy Illinois’ addiction healthcare system,” said Sara

Sara Moscato Howe, CEO, IADDA

Sara Moscato Howe, CEO, IADDA

Moscato Howe, CEO of the Illinois Alcoholism and Drug Dependence Association. “Little will remain standing on July 1.”

The legislature’s ‘doomsday’ budget—a spending plan without Governor Pat Quinn’s proposed income tax increase—guts both the Division of Alcoholism and Substance Abuse budget for community treatment providers and funds for addiction prevention for community prevention providers, a total of nearly $84 million.

The ‘doomsday’ budget will eliminate drug treatment services for 65,000 currently served by state-financed community providers across Illinois, Howe estimates.

Currently, untreated addiction costs the State of Illinois over $3 billion a year. Increases in health insurance rates, incarceration of non-violent drug offenders, domestic violence, on-the-job accidents, lost worker productivity, school drop-out rates, teen pregnancy, and traffic accidents and fatalities are all attributable to untreated addiction, says Howe.

“Crime rates, domestic violence incidents, and traffic accidents will explode across Illinois,” said Howe.

“We urge Speaker Michael Madigan, Minority Leader Tom Cross, Senate President John Cullerton, Minority Leader Christine Radogno and Governor Quinn to go back to work and to approve an income tax increase to restore the $84 million to the addiction healthcare system and not unleash a doomsday that will decimate Illinois communities.”

News Video: Feigenholtz Pushes 5¢ a Drink Alcohol Tax Increase

(Springfield, IL) — Illinois’ leading addiction prevention, treatment and mental health advocates today unveiled legislation at a Springfield press conference that increases the state’s alcohol tax by nickel a drink to help fund state human services and reduce drinking.

State Rep. Sara Feigenholtz

State Rep. Sara Feigenholtz (D-Chicago)

The bill, HB 4557, sponsored by State Representative Sara Feigenholtz (D-Chicago), would raise $254 million for cash-strapped Illinois and boost addiction healthcare services by $140 million and mental health care services by $92 million and the remaining $22 million would be deposited in the state’s general revenue fund—its daily checkbook.

“A nickel-a-drink increase will raise $254 million to help offset the state budget deficit and provide critical investments to addiction healthcare services,” said Sara Moscato Howe, CEO of the Illinois Alcoholism and Drug Dependence Association (IADDA).

Watch news video report from WAND-TV Ch. 17 (NBC) of Springfield. WLS-TV Ch. 7 (ABC) of Chicago has a brief story. And WTVW-Fox 7 of Evansville, Indiana carries a piece. And from the Chicagoist.

Alcohol, Drug Treatment Advocates Descend on Springfield Urging Lawmakers to Back 5¢ a Drink Tax, Reverse Quinn Addiction Healthcare Cuts

(Springfield, IL) – More than 100 Illinois drug and alcohol treatment and prevention advocates fanned out across the capitol on April 29 during IADDA’s Lobby Day to urge state lawmakers to increase the state’s alcohol tax by 5¢ a drink.

This move would raise $250 million for cash-strapped Illinois and restore $12.9 million cut from addiction healthcare services in Governor Pat Quinn‘s proposed FY 2010 budget.

“A nickel a drink increase will raise $250 million to help offset the budget deficit and restore budget cuts to addiction healthcare services,” said Sara Moscato Howe, CEO of the Illinois Alcoholism and Drug Dependence Association (IADDA). And legislators got the message loud and clear.”

“We recognize Illinois faces tough economic problems, but in these times more people turn to drugs and alcohol and treatment must be available.”

“We are urging Speaker Michael Madigan, House Minority Leader Tom Cross, Senate President John Cullerton, and Senate Minority Leader Christine Radogno to raise revenue and to restore cuts made to treatment services by passing a nickel-a-drink alcohol tax increase,” said Howe.

Howe noted that alcohol and drug treatment advocates will keep the pressure on lawmakers by calling and writing their local senators and representatives.

“We’re not going to let up,” said Howe.

Lawmakers are in the final stretch of the General Assembly’s spring legislation which is scheduled to adjourn on May 31.